The wrong of rudeness: learning modern civility from ancient Chinese philosophy

Book Cover
Average Rating
Publisher:
Oxford University Press,
Pub. Date:
[2019]
Language:
English
Description
In a time of fractious politics, being rude can feel wickedly gratifying, while being polite can feel simple-minded or willfully naïve. Do manners and civility even matter now? Is it worthwhile to make the effort to be polite? When rudeness has become routine and commonplace, why bother? When so much of public and social life with others is painful and bitterly acrimonious, why should anyone be polite? As Amy Olberding argues, civility and ordinary politeness are linked both to big values, such as respect and consideration, and to the fundamentally social nature of human beings. Being polite is not just a nicety--it has deep meaning. Olberding explores the often overwhelming temptations to incivility and rudeness, and the ways that they must and can be resisted. Drawing on the wisdom of early Chinese philosophers who lived through great political turmoil but nonetheless avidly sought to "mind their manners," the book articulates a way of thinking about politeness that is distinctively social. We can feel profoundly alienated from others, and others can sometimes be truly terrible, yet, as the Confucian philosophers encourage us to see, because we are social, neglecting the social and political courtesies comes at perilous cost. The book considers not simply why civility and politeness are important, but how. It reveals how small insults can accumulate to damage social relations, how separating people into tribes undermines our better interests, and how even bodily and facial expressions can influence our lives with others. Many of us, in spite of our best efforts, are often tempted to be rude, and will find here tools for fighting that temptation.
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ISBN:
9780190880965
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Grouping Information

Grouped Work ID60ac2072-eaaf-6bac-9c61-f0628bb2fa30
Grouping Titlewrong of rudeness learning modern civility from ancient chinese philosophy
Grouping Authorolberding amy
Grouping Categorybook
Last Grouping Update2019-11-12 17:27:21PM
Last Indexed2019-11-13 04:44:49AM

Solr Details

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authorOlberding, Amy,
author_displayOlberding, Amy
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display_descriptionIn a time of fractious politics, being rude can feel wickedly gratifying, while being polite can feel simple-minded or willfully naïve. Do manners and civility even matter now? Is it worthwhile to make the effort to be polite? When rudeness has become routine and commonplace, why bother? When so much of public and social life with others is painful and bitterly acrimonious, why should anyone be polite? As Amy Olberding argues, civility and ordinary politeness are linked both to big values, such as respect and consideration, and to the fundamentally social nature of human beings. Being polite is not just a nicety--it has deep meaning. Olberding explores the often overwhelming temptations to incivility and rudeness, and the ways that they must and can be resisted. Drawing on the wisdom of early Chinese philosophers who lived through great political turmoil but nonetheless avidly sought to "mind their manners," the book articulates a way of thinking about politeness that is distinctively social. We can feel profoundly alienated from others, and others can sometimes be truly terrible, yet, as the Confucian philosophers encourage us to see, because we are social, neglecting the social and political courtesies comes at perilous cost. The book considers not simply why civility and politeness are important, but how. It reveals how small insults can accumulate to damage social relations, how separating people into tribes undermines our better interests, and how even bodily and facial expressions can influence our lives with others. Many of us, in spite of our best efforts, are often tempted to be rude, and will find here tools for fighting that temptation. -- from Amazon.
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Bib IdFormatFormat CategoryEditionLanguagePublisherPublication DatePhysical Description
ils:.b20758777BookBooksEnglishOxford University Press, [2019]xii, 183 pages ; 22 cm.
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subject_facetConduct of life
Courtesy
Philosophy, Chinese
Philosophy, Confucian
title_displayThe wrong of rudeness : learning modern civility from ancient Chinese philosophy
title_fullThe wrong of rudeness : learning modern civility from ancient Chinese philosophy / Amy Olberding
title_shortThe wrong of rudeness
title_sublearning modern civility from ancient Chinese philosophy